Socially-distanced Thanksgiving

By: Libby Sanchez

Thanksgiving is a time when families travel long distances to be with their loved ones and celebrate together. It’s a day full of good times and usually ends with a turkey dinner and whatever sporting event is being broadcasted. Unfortunately, under the strict circumstances of Covid-19, this year traveling increases the risk of getting infected and spreading the virus to your loved ones. Although it may be hard to just stay home this year with immediate family, it may be the best idea. 

Staying home shouldn’t prevent you from having a great time with your family and doing yearly traditions. Try preparing annual recipes for family and neighbors, especially those at higher risk of catching Covid-19, and delivering them in a way that doesn’t involve direct contact with others. Maybe consider having a virtual dinner and sharing your recipes and visiting with the rest of your family that way.

Although, it’s understandable to still attend a large family dinner and celebrate like you do every year. If this is the route you plan on taking, make sure you and your family take the proper precautions. Bring along hand sanitizer and apply before and after touching someone, that way you and the person you’ve touched are less likely to be spreading germs. It’s also highly suggested to still be wearing a mask when not 6-feet apart, especially if you have family who travels from far places. This helps prevent your germs from spreading onto loved ones. Another great idea is to wipe down places you’ve sat at, that way germs are less likely to be passed onto clothes. 

Even though holidays aren’t the same this year because of the virus, it’s still important that everyone has a great time. That being said, we also need to make sure that we’re doing that in the safest way possible. Have a safe break! 

National Bullying Prevention Month

By: Libby Sanchez

Every October, communities and schools across the world join and work together in hopes of putting an end to all forms of bullying. During this month, many campaigns, protests, and new resources are aimed at raising awareness towards bullying. This aggressive and constant behavior should not go unrecognized. 

Bullying includes actions such as making threats, spreading rumors, or attacking someone physically or verbally. One of the most effective forms of bullying today is done online and is known as cyber-bullying. About 20% of students ages 12-18 have experienced bullying nationwide, and 15% reported to have been getting bullied online and harassed. Research indicates that consistent bullying can lead victims to suicidal behavior. All states have anti-bully legislation, but bullying is not illegal and continues to be a common occurrence.

Every week of October, the National Bullying Prevention committee releases new challenges around the world to help prevent bullying from occurring. Some of which include: making friends with someone you don’t know at school, standing up for others, and spreading kindness to those around you. This year they also ask that school’s and local businesses wear orange in hopes of sending a message to “stomp out bullying,”

This October, try your best to join in on these challenges and show your support to prevent bullying. If you or anyone else you know is going through bullying, reach out to a trusted adult and confide in them. Wear your orange and help create a world without bullying!

Staff Spotlight

By: Libby Sanchez

Mrs. Evans is one of the three hardest working counselors at Pleasanton High School. She not only has a positive impact on the students and adults, but our education system as well. Mrs. Evans takes her job very seriously and makes sure every student explores career options and stays motivated on their paths throughout high school. 

She attended PHS herself and after graduating from here in 1991, Mrs. Evans attended Texas State for three and a half years before graduating in 1994. She then came back to her hometown and started working in the family business once known as “Dowdy’s Store”, where she worked for 11 years after college. When word got around that the store may no longer be in business, Mrs. Evans had to start looking for more options here in Pleasanton. She wasn’t left with many, but the one that called out to her the most was indeed helping children at our local schools. She started as a math teacher at our Jr. High in 2006 and taught math for 4 years. A few years after teaching math, she became a counselor in both Pleasanton, Jourdanton, and Poteet before she settled here at the high school. 

Although counseling wasn’t always the goal for Mrs. Evans, she’s grown to love the job and the joy of helping students. “The counselor’s role is basically to be the students’ advocate, anything a student needs help with, I´m there”. Mrs. Evans has gone above and beyond to make sure this school year could be where it is now. From managing student schedules online instead of face-to-face, to college career plans for our seniors, Mrs. Evans does it all. This is her sixth year as a counselor at PHS and although she’s had to make major changes to how she does things this year, she’s come out the other side and made things work.